Understanding Colorado Hunt Codes

With some units approaching 50 different types of available license.  We wanted to try help you understand how the Division of Wildlife defines different hunts.  It starts with a "Hunt Code" (We call them "License Type") that give you the basic information of what, and how you will be hunting.  To help simplify this, for the regulations dates, we've added a "Notes" column that gives a written description of the Hunt Code. 

After the intial regulations, you will be able to find that Hunt Code used on the rest of the Unit Page on our website, to give you harvest inormation, drawing odds, and preference point tables. 

 

How to Read Hunt Codes (1-5) and Tables (A-E)

Click on the Image Below or Scroll Down to:
get a description, tips, and see lists of availability 

 

 

   A: License Type   B: Season Dates   C: Valid Units   D: License Notes   E: License List   E: Animal Type   2: Sex   3: Hunting Unit   4: Hunt Dates and Type   5: Weapon Type

 Hunt Code Tables

Show the Limited Licenses Available. These are available through the draw or as left over licenses. Some hunt tables in the bear section include hunt codes for over-the-counter licenses. Th ese are not available through the draw.

 

A. The Hunt Code

The Hunt Code column displays the code you will use to apply for the license you desire. Read the information carefully, as there are many possible hunt codes associated with each unit, and they may have changed since the last time you hunted. Please see section below on how to read hunt codes.

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B.  The Dates

The Dates Column lists the applicable season dates when the license is valid. Please look at the rows carefully, as each unit may have multiple hunt dates.
 

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C. The Valid Units

The Valid Units column will also display information for each hunt and whether it is private land only or has other restrictions. If a hunt is labeled private land, you should get permission from a landowner in that unit before you apply for that license.

On DIYHuntingMaps.com, if the column is blank, the license is valid on the page you're on. 

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D. The Notes

This section was specially made by us at DIY Hunting Maps for your convenience.  We've built a written description to help you figure out exactly what that license is valid for.  Also, if that unit has any special notes, or regulations.  We added that for you too.

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E. The List

The List displays what type of license you are buying. Th ere are opportunities to purchase more than one license during the year, as long as the licenses meet the requirements of being List A, B or C. For details, see “How to get more than one license” sections under the big-game species you’d like to hunt in the following brochure pages. When applying in the draw, DO NOT include the list letter on the application.

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Hunt Codes

 Below shows the break-down for Colorado Big Game Hunt Codes.

1. The First Letter

 The first letter of the code designates the species. (D = deer, E = elk, A = pronghorn (antelope), M = moose and B = bear)

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2. The Second Letter

 The second letter of the code designates the sex of the animal you want to hunt. (M = male, F = female and E = either sex)

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3. The Third Part (3 Numbers)

 The third part, three numbers, designates the unit you want to hunt. (001 = Unit 1, 201 = Unit 201, etc.; 000 = statewide). If more than one unit is valid for a hunt code, only the lowest unit number will show in the code.

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4. The Fourth Part (a Letter and a Number) 

 The fourth part, a letter and a number, indicates hunt dates. For example, O1 = fi rst season, O2 = second season, O3 = third season and so on. P is for privateland- only hunts followed by the season number: P1, P2, P3, P4 and P5. E1 = early season, L1 = late season, K2, K3 = youth only hunts. Th ere are also Ws for Ranching for Wildlife and S for a split unit.

The previous is from the Division of Wildlife, but we wanted to give you a complete list:

     E1-Early Season
     O1-1st Season
     O2-2nd Season
     O3-3rd Season
     O4-4th Season
     L1-1st Late Season
     L2-2nd Late Season
     L3-3rd Late Season
     S1-Split 1st Season
     S2-Split 2nd Season
     S3-Split 3rd Season
     S4-Split 4th Season
     K1-Youth 1st Season
     K2-Youth 2nd Season
     K3-Youth 3rd Season
     W1-Ranching for Wildlife 1st Season
     W2-Ranching for Wildlife 2nd Season
     W3-Ranching for Wildlife 3rd Season
     W4-Ranching for Wildlife 4th Season
     W5-Ranching for Wildlife 5th Season
     W6-Ranching for Wildlife 6th Season
     Y1-Landowner Pilot Public 1st Season
     Y2-Landowner Pilot Public 2nd Season
     Y3-Landowner Pilot Public 3rd Season
     Y4-Landowner Pilot Public 4th Season
     Y5-Landowner Pilot Public 5th Season
     Y6-Landowner Pilot Public 6th Season
     Y7-Landowner Pilot Public 7th Season
     P1-Private Land 1st Season
     P2-Private Land 2nd Season
     P3-Private Land 3rd Season
     P4-Private Land 4th Season
     P5-Private Land 5th Season
     P6-Private Land 6th Season

A few more helpful hints: 

Within the Regulations and the Preference Points, we only display the most common licenses.  Click on the link below the table to see "Youth, Pilot Public, Ranching for Wildlife, and Landowner Licenses" 

There is also one hunt code with "J2".  We have not been able to figure this out.

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5. The Last Letter

 The last letter in the hunt code indicates what manner of take the license is good for. A = archery, M = muzzleloader, R = rifle and associated methods.

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